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The Integration and Elimination of Processes in Psychological Development (Abridged)






Recent research on Axis XII has posited intriguing hypotheses concerning the development of the human psyche. This development is suggested to follow a consistent pattern that encompasses the integration and elimination of processes, referred to as pathways, modes, and compound modes. This paper aims to present a contemporary interpretation of these concepts.


According to Axis XII, it is crucial to comprehend the psyche as bifurcated into two distinct zones. To exemplify this notion, let us consider Conducting and Revision. Out of the sixteen types, eight predominantly exhibit Conducting (led by Pi or Je) and eight primarily display Revision (led by Ji or Pe). Consequently, a Conductor type is expected to have the majority of their libido concentrated in the zone of Conducting, while a Reviser type would have their libido predominantly situated in the zone of Revision. This uniformity arises from the necessity to exclude or deprive the opposite mode to establish a primary mode of Conducting or Revision; thus, integrating a process entails the deprivation of its counterpart.


Figure A

Zone I

​​Zone II

​Revision (led by Ji or Pe)

​​Conducting (led by Pi or Je)

​​Conducting (led by Pi or Je)

Revision (led by Ji or Pe)


Similar phenomena can be observed in the development of double introversion or extroversion (Figure B), as well as in polarized development (Figure C).


Figure B

Zone I

Zone II

Interaction (led by Je or Pe)

Analysis (led by Pi or Ji)

Analysis (led by Pi or Ji)

Interaction (led by Je or Pe)

Figure C

Zone I

Zone II

Cognizance (led by Pi or Pe)

Alignment (led by Je or Ji)

Alignment (led by Je or Ji)

Cognizance (led by Pi or Pe)


With a few exceptions, development appears fluid throughout childhood and adolescence, barring specific cases. Some degree of crystallization tends to manifest in the late teens or early twenties, signifying the integration of a primary mode—a synchronization between two functions.


AXIS XII delineates six distinct modes:

  1. Alignment - regulating the interchange between introverted judgment (Ji) and extroverted judgment (Je)

  2. Analysis - directing the interchange between introverted perception (Pi) and introverted judgment (Ji)

  3. Cognizance - overseeing the interchange between introverted perception (Pi) and extroverted perception (Pe)

  4. Conducting - governing the interchange between introverted perception (Pi) and extroverted judgment (Je)

  5. Interaction - managing the interchange between extroverted perception (Pe) and extroverted judgment (Je)

  6. Revision - controlling the interchange between introverted judgment (Ji) and extroverted perception (Pe)


Considering development, let us examine an NiFe type as an example:


This type has three potential primary modes: Conducting, Analysis, or Cognizance. The modes of Alignment, Interaction, and Revision are not feasible, as they exclude the Pi frame.


  • If the primary mode emerges as Conducting, it does so by depriving the processes involved in Revision, leading to libido pooling in positions one and two (Pi+Je; Ni and Fe).


  • If the primary mode emerges as Analysis, it does so by depriving the processes involved in Interaction, resulting in libido pooling in positions one and three (Pi+Ji; Ni and Ti).


  • If the primary mode emerges as Cognizance, it does so by depriving the processes involved in Alignment, causing libido pooling in positions one and four (Pi+Pe; Ni and Se).


Consequently, the emergence of Conducting allows us to view the psyche in two separate "zones" following a 1+2 vs. 3+4 division. This perspective aligns with more traditional frameworks, yielding sixteen types—eight Conductors and eight Revisers.


Analogously, through the emergence of Analysis, the psyche primarily operates subjectively, allocating libido in a manner that deprives extroversion, rendering it inferior in this psychology.


Inversely, through the emergence of Cognizance, Alignment is suppressed as the psyche seeks expansion, necessitating the inhibition of rational components. In this instance, judgment is deemed inferior.


In conclusion, examining development and the emergence of a primary mode reveals the presence of an opposing process, which establishes a duality distinct from Jung's original proposition. This approach imbues greater fluidity to type and development, with each type possessing three possible inferior processes. By considering these alternative perspectives, we can further our understanding of the nuances in psychological development and expand the scope of AXIS XII's applicability.

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